In last month's American Journal of Ophthalmology was an interesting article, Alcohol Consumption and the Long-Term Incidence of Cataract and Cataract Surgery: The Blue Mountains Eye Study. This study evaluated if there was any correlation between alcohol consumption and cataract formation in over 3,500 people over the age of 49 years.

The results were very interesting:

  • After adjusting for age, gender, smoking, diabetes, myopia,
    socioeconomic status, and steroid use, total alcohol consumption of over
    2 standard drinks per day was associated with a significantly increased
    likelihood of cataract surgery.
  • Abstinence from alcohol was also associated with increased likelihood of
    cataract surgery when compared to a total alcohol consumption of 1 to 2
    standard drinks per day.

The conclusion:

A U-shaped association of alcohol consumption with the long-term risk of
cataract surgery was found in this older cohort: moderate consumption
was associated with 50% lower cataract surgery incidence, compared
either to abstinence or heavy alcohol consumption.

This study seems to support the belief that moderate consumption of alcohol is beneficial to our health.  If you are looking for a good source for a wine deal, check out Cinderella Wine.  They offer a daily that expires at midnight.  What a great name! 

Just remember, stop after that second glass!!

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