Follow these simple eye care tips for healthy eyes all season long.

Now that we have officially entered the first full week of June, it is time to begin celebrating all of the fun and excitement that the summer season has to offer. Whether you are someone who likes to curl up in a lawn chair with one of your favorite books, you enjoy exhilarating outdoor activities such as kayaking or jet skiing, or the sunshine itself is enough to keep you happy, there is no shortage of reasons to get outside and soak up the summer weather this season.

However, just as we need to protect our skin from the many harmful dangers of the suns UV rays, we also need to do our part to keep our eyes shielded from the treacherous sun rays that threaten to keep us locked up indoors, away from the sunshine, all summer long.

Now, we’re not saying that you need to avoid the outside all together this summer season. In fact, we here at EyeCare 20/20 like getting outside and soaking up the sights and smells of summer as much as the next person. However,  it is important to remember that each and every time you head outside into the blinding summer sun, your eyes need to ramp up their security and bring out the big guns; we’re talking full-on, extreme UV protection.

To help you get a better idea of how you can best protect yourself, your eyes and your vision during these bright, long summer days, we have put together some of the most beneficial tips that we could think of that will keep your eyes safely away from the dangers that the UV light can bring. Be sure to follow these tips carefully so that you can truly enjoy the most of this year’s summer vacation.

1. Wear Sunglasses On Top Of Contact Lenses

Just because you are wearing corrective contact lenses instead of physical glasses does not mean that you are also excused from wearing sunglasses. No contact lenses can properly protect you against the sun’s harmful UV rays and the damage that they can do to your eyes. Plus, sunglasses are helpful for preventing the drying effect most contact lens wearers get, which is caused by wind.

2. Check Your Sunglasses Lens Tint

Many people believe the long-standing rumor that darker sunglasses provide better protection against the sun. However, that is nowhere near true. The lens tint of your outdoor sunglasses should block around 80 percent of transmissible light, but no more than 90 percent to 92 percent of light. When choosing a tint that works best for you, neutral gray, amber, brown or green are good colors to choose from.

3. Kids Also Need Eye Protection

Adults and seniors are not the only ones whose eyes can suffer at the hands of the bright, shining sun. In fact, children are much more susceptible to the dangers of UV rays than adults. This is because children’s eyes are not able to block UV rays as well as adults’ eyes can. Therefore, for the best protection, consider UV-protected sunglasses for your children, and remember that small infants should always be shaded from direct exposure to the sun.

Your eyes are one of the most important aspects of your body, and your vision is not something that should be taken for granted. Be sure to protect your eyes this summer by wearing the proper protective gear that is necessary for shielding your eyes from harmful UV rays.

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