How to be sure that you’re ready for the responsibility of contacts.

Whether you are a teenager who has simply outgrown your bulky lenses, or you are an adult who is finally ready to move forward to the world of contacts, it is no secret that glasses can be a pain in our day-to-day lives and it is only natural to want to move on to a clearer more comfortable lens option.

While glasses are a great form of vision correction for children and teens who are not yet responsible enough to handle contact lenses, or even for adults who are nervous about the prospect of contacts, these lenses are obtrusive and limiting. For instance, if you are someone who is active in sports and physical activity, glasses can make it difficult to enjoy your activity or may even hold you back from living up to your full potential due to limited site or chance of injury.

Luckily, if the time has come where you have outgrown your lenses, yet you are still not ready for the commitment of LASIK eye surgery, contacts make a great option for teens and adults looking to ditch their bulky glasses for good.

However, just like with many other vision correction options, contacts take a lot of care and maintenance, and you must first make sure that you are ready for the commitment that they bring before leaving your glasses behind. To help you determine whether contact lenses may be something that could benefit your lifestyle and vision, we have put together these tips which will help you decide if you are ready to wear contacts:

How Much Responsibility Do Contacts Require?

While contacts and glasses may serve the same purpose―to correct your vision and improve your lifestyle―they are two very different ways for correcting your vision. The most noticeable difference between the two being that glasses are worn outside of your eyes, and contacts are worn inside. Therefore, contacts need a lot of care and upkeep to make sure that you are putting a clean lens into your eye and are following the directions given to you in order to avoid any problems.

Will Contacts Be As Comfortable As Glasses?

Since contact lenses rest on top of the eye and require daily insertion, they can take a little adjustment and getting used to before you find that they are as comfortable, if not more so, than your glasses. However, because there are so many different fits and options when it comes to contacts, there is a large chance that you will find a lens that is completely fit to your eye and feels as though it is not even there.

Is It Difficult To Put Contacts On?

One of the bigest reasons why people are so hesitant to wear contact lenses and ditch their glasses in the first place is because they are hesitant about having to apply them. This is a natural feeling as no one ever wants to have to put something into their own eye. However, after learning how to insert and remove their lenses, most people find it completely painless, and quite easy to do.

While contact lenses are a great option for teens and adults, the best way to truly be free from the restrictions and limitations of corrective lenses is through LASIK eye surgery. EyeCare 20/20 is one of the leading facilities for this helpful vision procedure and even offers free consultations for those who want to learn if this popular surgery is right for them. To learn more, be sure to contact us today.

 

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