New study shows your favorite song may relax you during vision surgery.

Music has always been a source of relaxation and serenity for many people all across the world. Whether you are having a stressful day and are looking for a chance to relax, or you are feeling anxious about an upcoming work meeting or personal event, popping in your headphones and listening to the familiar beat of one of your favorite songs is one surefire way to calm the nerves and fall into a sense of serenity.

But why exactly does music have this relaxing effect on our nerves and anxiety? Many studies have shown that music with a strong beat can stimulate our brainwaves to resonate in sync with that same beat. For instance, a song featuring faster beats will promote sharper concentration and more alert thinking, while a slower tempo song can help put your brain in a calm, meditative state.

However, our brain waves are not the only thing effected by the beat of the music. Whenever there are alterations in our brainwaves, we also experience changes in other bodily functions. Those controlled by our body’s autonomic nervous system, such as breathing and heart rate, may also find themselves being altered by the changes in beat and tempo. This can mean slower breathing, slower heart rate and significant relaxation across the board.

Knowing that our body reacts positively to calm music in stressful, nervous situations, what better place to enjoy the sound of your favorite song than when throughout your vision correction procedure?

While procedures such as LASIK and cataract surgery are some of the safest, most effective vision surgeries available today, that does still not keep many people from becoming nervous before they sit down for their procedure. Thinking of this, Pornpattana Vichitvejpaisal, M.D., of Chiang Mai University in Thailand, and colleagues conducted a survey looking in to whether or not music would have an effect on nerves and stress for patients undergoing cataract surgery.

Participants in the study were randomly allocated to binaural beat, musical intervention or control, and each group consisted of 47 patients matched for age, gender, cataract type and other health factors.

The researchers found that, compared with the control group, there was a significant decrease in anxiety level and in systolic blood pressure in the binaural beat and musical intervention groups. This shows that music may not only be a great way to decrease stress and nerves during cataract surgery, but it could also improve patients’ health outcomes and satisfaction with their care.

The EyeCare 20/20 surgical facilities, including our LASIK room and minor surgery room within our office, and our OR suites at River Drive Surgery Center are all equipped with a Sonos System that allows us to play different Pandora stations within each room, based either the patients or surgeons tastes. If you are concerned about whether your nerves will be a factor for your upcoming vision correction procedure, why not see firsthand within our facilities how music can calm the nerves and provide you with a relaxing, comfortable surgical experience.

To set up your free vision consultation today, be sure to contact EyeCare 20/20 in East Hanover, NJ at (973) 560-1500.

 

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