New studies look at the connection between headaches and vision problems.

There are few worse reoccurring pains and aches than those that are accompanied by a pounding headache. They often come when we least expect them―sitting on the couch reading a great book, concentrating hard at our desks looking over a pile of work, sitting outside in the sunshine enjoying the nice weather. However, when they hit, headaches can range from a minor annoyance and ache to a debilitating migraine that leaves you in great amounts of pain.

One of the most frustrating things about a headache is the fact that they do not work like any other pain-causing injury, where you can directly pinpoint the source of the discomfort and understand what caused it. Many times, a headache can occur simply when you are sitting around and relaxing, away from any type of physical activity.

However, recently many doctors have looked at the type of situations that can sometimes prompt headaches―reading, bright lights, concentrating hard, being on the computer―and they have noticed one reoccurring trend: all of these situations are strongly associated with vision. Does this mean that our eyesight and vision are somehow linked to these frustrating head pains? These doctors decided to put this theory to the test.

Vision and Headaches

There are several vision situations that have proven to overwork the muscles in the eyes, causing eye strain and head pain. One particular case where this is known is a refractive error. When light enters our eyes, it is directed towards our retina. Each eye takes in its own individual image from each angle and then sends that picture to the brain to fuse together. However, refractive errors―when your eyes can not clearly focus on images and light from the outside world―can cause headaches as the brain tries to understand the blurry images.

A weak muscle in one or both eyes can also be a serious cause of headaches for both children and adults. Our muscles that control our eye’s movements are always working together in order for us to see images clearly. When the muscles work together to look at an object, we process both angles from each eye and produce one distinctive image in our brains. However, when one muscle isn’t working as strongly as the other, it can cause the other to become overworked, causing serious muscle strain and head pain.

Vision Check-Ups

If you find that you are constantly getting painful headaches whenever you are concentrating hard on a task or reading for a long time, it is important that you see an eye doctor in order to undergo a vision test that will help determine whether or not you need a vision aid, such as prescription lenses. While headaches are not always caused by vision problems, undergoing an eye test will help rule out any vision problems and can help look into whether or not you are dealing with a more serious problem at hand.

To schedule your annual vision test, contact EyeCare 20/20 today and ensure that your headaches and vision problems are a thing of the past.

 

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