Comparing traditional cataract surgery with the advanced laser options.

Given that cataract surgery is one of the most popular vision procedures performed all throughout the country, with nearly 3 million Americans having this procedure done each and every year, it only makes sense that scientists and doctors would continuously work to improve and perfect the surgery itself. In fact, in just the last decade alone, we have seen a number of cataract surgery innovations come and go, including the optimization of the incision through different types of laser surgery options.

However, when it comes down to it, what are the real differences between the traditional method of cataract surgery that has been used for years, and the new methods of laser cataract surgery that have taken the industry by storm? Today we are comparing the two methods of cataract surgery so that you can get a better idea of which procedure may be right for you.

laser cataract surgery

Traditional Cataract Surgery

When eye doctors speak to you about traditional cataract surgery, they are typically talking about the cataract surgery method that uses a hand-held metal or diamond blade in order to make an incision in your eye. This incision is made in the area of your eye where the sclera meets the cornea, creating a space for the surgeon to break up and remove the cataract (located directly behind the pupil). From there, your surgeon can insert an intraocular lens (IOL) which, when implanted, replaces the cloudy natural lens in your eye.

The traditional method of cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures performed throughout the world, and is also one of the most safe and effective as well. While the outcome of your traditional cataract surgery will be predictably high-quality, your surgeon’s level of skill and experience will play a significant role as well.

Laser Cataract Surgery

When it comes to Laser Cataract Surgery, there are several different laser options to choose from. We here at EyeCare 20/20 use both  Abbott Catalys Precision Laser System and theAlcon LenSx ―both leading platforms when it comes to the Laser Cataract Surgery procedure. In fact, the EyeCare 20/20 office is one of only a few  worldwide that have access to these two leading laser cataract platforms.

One of the biggest differences of having laser cataract surgery when compared with the traditional procedure is how the incision is made. While the traditional procedure requires a human hand to guide the blade, a laser can make perfect zigzag incisions that interlock precisely and provide a significant advancement over manual technology. Both the LenSx and Catalys Laser Systems allow Dr. Silverman to perform cataract surgery with more precision and accuracy than ever before, all without having to use any kind of blade! This is a significant improvement for both cataract surgeons and their patients.

If you are interested in learning more about the differences between traditional cataract surgery and laser cataract surgery, be sure to contact EyeCare 20/20 today. We can set up a consultation for you to come in and see which of these two beneficial procedures would work best for you!

 

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Source: https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/laser-cataract-surgery.htm

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