If you struggle with below-average eyesight, you’ve probably thought about getting LASIK surgery at some point.

However, the thought of getting surgery (even a safe surgery like LASIK) can cause anxiety in just about anyone. So, you’ve probably also considered long-term contact use, which isn’t quite as scary in an immediate sense.

But which vision correction method is right for you? Should you get LASIK surgery or plan to use contacts for the rest of your life? Let’s discuss the benefits of both so you can make an informed decision.

LASIK surgery: What is it, and what are the pros of getting the procedure as opposed to using contact lenses?

LASIK surgery is used to correct vision in anyone who is nearsighted, farsighted, or who has astigmatism. It has become increasingly popular in recent years, and with good reason. We’ll talk about those reasons now, and then we’ll discuss a few reasons you might not want to get LASIK.

Why LASIK surgery is better than contact lens use

You might be surprised to learn that LASIK surgery is widely considered to be safer than long-tern contact lens use. (But don’t get me wrong – contact lenses are still super safe.)

Plus, LASIK is cheaper than buying contact lenses over a long period of time. LASIK surgery is a one-time fee. On the other hand, with contact lenses, you end up paying several hundreds of dollars every year you use them. That can add up to a lot of money over the course of your lifetime!

On top of that, contact lenses aren’t the most convenient thing in the world. You have to remember to order them every month, take them out every night before you go to sleep, purchase contact solution and take care of the lenses, and more. With LASIK, you get the procedure once, and you’re good to go!

Bottom line: LASIK is a quick, safe way to improve your vision, and it offers long-lasting results without requiring you to bother with the inconvenience of contact lenses or glasses.

Contact lenses: What are they, and what are the benefits of using them as opposed to getting LASIK surgery?

Okay, so we’ve discussed the benefits of LASIK. Now, let’s talk about contact lenses.

Contact lenses are thin lenses that you place on your eye to correct your vision. To get contact lenses, you need a prescription, but fortunately the fitting process is quick and painless.

Why contact lenses are better than getting LASIK surgery

Any surgery comes with certain risks. While LASIK surgery is incredibly safe, you’ll need to check with your doctor to make sure you’re a good candidate before you have the procedure done.

And sometimes, you may still need your contacts or glasses after getting LASIK. This can happen to people who are over age 40, have presbyopia, or have bifocals.

Another thing to keep in mind is that LASIK is irreversible. If that worries you, then you may want to stick to a more controllable and temporary vision correction method, like contacts or glasses.

In Conclusion

At the end of the day, you should choose the vision correction method that’s right for you. Everyone has different needs, and taking yours into consideration is a good idea.

That being said, many people enjoy better vision and avoid the hassle of dealing with contacts or glasses when they get LASIK surgery. If you’re interested in learning more about LASIK and how the procedure can help your vision, contact us today!

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